Common Questions

What is Islam?

The word Islam means voluntary “Submission” or “Surrender” to the Will of God. It derives from the root word “salam”, meaning peace.

In the Quran, God defines that the only purpose for which He created mankind is to Worship Him. Islam recognizes that humankind has free choice in whether to obey or disobey God, but ultimately we will be held accountable to God in the next life for the choices that we make in this life.

God sent Prophets to teach mankind how to worship Him; starting with Adam, including Noah, Abraham, Moses, Jesus and the last of the messengers, Muhammad (peace be upon them all). The Islamic position is that all of these prophets came with the same message, that there is no deity worthy of worship except the One True God, known in Arabic as Allah.

Islam recognizes the close relationship between the body and soul. Whereas the body originates from the earth and has a defined period of life on this earth, the soul originates from God and does not die. Islam encourages the individual to focus on keeping the soul healthy, through the remembrance, obedience and worship of God. There should be a correct balance in strengthening the soul and not over-indulging with the pleasures of the body. Islam is a natural way of life that encourages one to give due attention to their relationship with God and His creation. Islam teaches that it is through the doing of good deeds and seeking the pleasure of God that souls find true happiness and peace. It is in this context that the word Islam derives from the rootword ‘salam’, or peace.

 

Taken from: http://www.whyislam.org/submission/what-is-submission/

Who are Muslims?

One billion people from a vast range of races, nationalities and cultures across the globe – from the southern Philippines to Nigeria – are united by their common Islamic faith. About 18% live in the Arab world; the world’s largest Muslim community is in Indonesia; substantial parts of Asia and most of Africa are Muslim, while significant minorities are to be found in the Soviet Union, China, North and South America, and Europe.

 

Taken from: http://uscmuslims.com/islam

Other Resources:

http://www.whyislam.org/submission/what-is-submission
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islam
http://www.islamicity.com/education/understandingislamandmuslims

What do Muslims Believe?

Muslims believe in One, Unique, Incomparable God; in the Angels created by Him; in the prophets through whom His revelations were brought to mankind; in the Day of Judgement and individual accountability for actions; in God’s complete authority over human destiny and in life after death. Muslims believe in a chain of prophets starting with Adam and including Noah, Abraham, Ishmael, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Job, Moses, Aaron, David, Solomon, Elias, Jonah, John the Baptist, and Jesus, peace be upon them. But God’s final message to man, a reconfirmation of the eternal message and a summing-up of all that has gone before was revealed to the Prophet Muhammad through Gabriel.

 

Taken from: http://uscmuslims.com/islam

Other Resources:

http://www.whyislam.org/submission/what-is-submission
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islam
http://www.islamicity.com/education/understandingislamandmuslims

What are the 5 Pillars of Islam?
  1. The Declaration of Faith (Shahada)
    This consists of the belief in and declaration of the words: “There is no deity but God, and Muhammad is the messenger of God.”
  2. Prayer
    Muslims perform five obligatory prayers each day. Islamic prayers are a direct link between the worshiper and God. Islam has no hierarchical authority or priesthood. A learned Muslim chosen by each congregation leads the prayers.
  3. Zakat (Charity)
    One of the most important principles of Islam is that all things belong to God and that wealth is held in trust by human beings. Zakat, or charitable giving, “purifies” wealth by setting aside a portion for those in need. This payment is usually two and a half percent of one’s capital.
  4. Fasting
    Every year in the Islamic lunar month of Ramadan, Muslims fast from first light until sunset. The fast is another method of self-purification.
  5. Pilgrimage
    A pilgrimage to Mecca, or Hajj, is an obligation for those who are physically or financially able.

 

Taken from: http://uscmuslims.com/islam

Other Resources:

http://www.whyislam.org/submission/five-pillars-of-islam-2/faith
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islam
http://www.islamicity.com/education/understandingislamandmuslims